Sustainability: The Kimono and The Haori

by Jennifer Dares and Cecilia Martins Gomes, MA Fashion Students  The word kimono means “thing to wear” in Japanese; the original word is kirumono (Steele 2005; Milhaupt 2014; ). This paper seeks to analyze what aspects of kimono are sustainable. To answer that question two styles of kimono from the Ryerson Fashion Research Collection were…

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The Journey of a Chinese Robe: Part 4

In ancient Chinese culture, a robe is a symbol of status depending on the colour, the quality and decorative elements of the garment. In order to compare the robe in the Ryerson Fashion Research Collection (FRC2016.01.001) to others in other collections,  dress historian and curator, Ingrid Mida and I visited the Textile Museum of Canada to…

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The Journey of a Chinese Robe: Part 3

Everywhere we look, symbols abound. In historic dress originating from the Chinese culture, symbols on a robe can be read like words on a page. In this post, I will continue my analysis of the robe that has been the focus on the last two blog posts (FRC2016.01.001).  In this part, I will dive deeper…

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The Journey of a Chinese Robe: Part 2

In Part I of the series, I reviewed the history of Philip Brunelleschi Cousland, the original owner of the robe (FRC2016.01.001 shown in the photo below). In this part, I will consider the structural and decorative elements of the garment using the Observation checklist from the Dress Detective (note 1). With a lining made of…

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The Language of the Kimono

by Ingrid Mida, Acting Curator/Collection Co-ordinator Kimonos, long associated with the cultural fabric of Japan, have their own language. For example, ‘Kimono o kiru’ means ‘I’m going to wear kimono.’ Although this loose-fitting, T-shaped garment is worn by both men and women, and generally constructed out of lengths of a standard width fabric, every element…

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